Celebrating 30 Years
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In May 1988, a Bering Air aircraft lifted the 41-year-old "Ice Curtain" between Alaska and Russia.

The opening of the airways between western Alaska and the former Soviet Far East represented the fulfillment of a goal that had long existed in the thoughts of many Alaskans and Russians alike. Opportunities abound for developing new friendships, reuniting separated families, and replacing years of misunderstanding with joint efforts and enterprise.

However, Chukotka - the region where Bering Air flies - is still considered to be a "closed" region within the Russian Federation. U.S. citizens and other nationals must have a valid passport, Russian visa and an official entry permission document signed by appropriate Russian/Chukotkan authorities. Visas are issued based upon an invitation from a person or corporation.

WHAT BERING AIR DOES FOR FLIGHTS TO THE RUSSIAN FAR EAST

  • Arrange for the flight across the international border with proper Russian offices.
  • Arrange for US Customs to meet incoming flights.
  • Payment of all US Customs and Immigration fees.

WHAT TO SEE AND DO IN THE RUSSIAN FAR EAST

Chukotka is a closed region of Russia that has had limited contact with the rest of the world which makes the area a very unique place to visit.

The closest international airport that we serve is Provideniya, which is one of two in the Chukotka Region. Provideniya is a deep-water port. The mountains are steep and treeless with many bays along the coast. Russian, Chukchi & Siberian Yupik cultures, customs and languages fascinate the visitors to the Provideniya region. Sightseeing, photography, walking around and visiting with people are some of the things to do.

Warning: This is not a luxury trip. There are limited shopping opportunities, public restaurants & services or entertainment in the forms that you may be used to. There are no facilities for the physically challenged. Every building has long flights of cement stairs.

The Capital of Chukotka - Anadyr - opened its airport to international flights in 2003. Over the past few years, Anadyr has witnessed many improvements, and now residents and guests alike can enjoy comfortable restaurants, hotels, and modern supermarkets.

Your Russian Hosts are interested in making your trip to Russia a memorable experience and will go out of their way to help you create a lasting memory.

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO TO GO TO CHUKOTKA

You are responsible for arranging an invitation for yourself and/or your group. You are also responsible for obtaining an entry permission document (Chukotka Pass). This document usually takes four to five weeks to process so please plan accordingly.

With your U.S. passport and Russian invitation in hand, you may apply to the Consulate of the Russian Federation in San Francisco, California or Seattle, Washington for a visa to enter Russia.

If you don't have an invitation, some tour companies, like Red Star Travel or Circumpolar Expeditions, can provide you with one when you apply for a Russian visa.

For more information on the process of getting a visa, please visit Red Star Travel's website, www.travel2russia.com or email Circumpolar Expeditions at info@arctictravel.net. Both of these companies can assist you with the required paperwork. When passports, invitations, entry permissions (Chukotka Pass), visas, and travel dates are arranged, the travelers need to find their transportation to Nome. Alaska Airlines serves Nome daily with passenger service from Anchorage and the continental United States.

U.S. Residents, please refer to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Regulations before you leave for the trip.

*When you select your travel dates, keep in mind that Russian airports are closed on the weekends, which is Friday and Saturday, U.S. time.

ALASKA RUSSIAN TIME CHANGE

Set your watch 20 hours ahead when you travel across the International Dateline from Nome, Alaska to Chukotka Region, Russia.

Bering Air passengers lose a day when they cross the International Dateline going over, and gain a day when they come back. For example, 10 a.m., May 1 in Nome, is 6 a.m. May 2, in Provideniya.

*When you communicate with Russians about your travel plans, remember to specify which country's times and dates you mean.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

Bering Air has a wide range of passenger and cargo aircraft to meet your flight requirements. The aircraft assigned to your flight will depend on the destination and the load (Total passenger weights plus all the baggage and/or cargo).

HOW MUCH WILL A FLIGHT COST?

Contact Bering Air for current charter rates and passenger seat fares.

Call (907) 443-8988 or email: russiantravel@beringair.com

SEAT FARE PASSENGERS

Seat fares are sold on the empty legs of charters or when there is space on a charter. Contact Bering Air for current seat fare pricing.

SEAT FARE PASSENGERS ARE ALLOWED 50 POUNDS (22.5 Kilograms) OF BAGGAGE. Excess baggage is charged at the rate of $2.00 per pound, and is allowed on a space-available basis only.

NOTE: Space is limited by volume as well as by weight. Pack densely, with a preference for moderately sized, rather than large bags.

CHARTER CHECKLIST

  1. Arrange for invitation from Russian sponsor.
  2. Apply for visas.
  3. Arrange entry permission document (Chukotka Pass).
  4. Contact the Bering Air travel coordinator at our Russian Desk at least two weeks in advance to provide payment and the following information for every passenger on the flight:
    1. Name on passport,
    2. Passport number & Expiration date
    3. Date of birth
    4. Nationality
    5. Travel dates
    6. Form of payment.
  5. Arrange transportation to Nome.

Russian Travel Desk, Bering Air, Inc.

P.O. Box 1650
Nome, Alaska 99762-1650 U.S.A.
Open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday
Phone (907) 443-8988
Fax (907) 443-5919
E-mail: russiantravel@beringair.com

   
   
   

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